0 0
Tamarind Chutney

Share it on your social network:

Or you can just copy and share this url

Tamarind Chutney

Features:
  • Veg
Cuisine:
  • 40 mins
  • Serves 10
  • Easy

Ingredients

Share

The tamarind chutney represents the perfect marriage between sweet and sour flavors! Often spread on top of popular street foods or as a dipping sauce for snacks, tamarind chutney is one that everyone should know how to make! The best part is that it is extremely easy to create this sweet and sour, thick chutney!

Health Benefits

The tamarind has many nutritional components. These components include high levels of vitamin C, B, and E, phosphorus, calcium, potassium, iron, dietary fiber, and manganese. Tamarind also has numerous organic compounds in it that make it a good anti-inflammatory and antioxidant agent.

Good news for those that are one a diet, tamarind is extremely diet-friendly. It has properties inhibit enzymes in the body that specifically help store fat. Tamarind also aids in the production of serotonin, which makes you feel happy!

Calories per serving: 113

Total fat: 1.5 g

Carbohydrates: 25.7 g

Protein: 0.2 g

(Visited 8 times, 1 visits today)

How to make Tamarind Chutney

  1. In a saucepan over medium flame, add oil and splutter cumin seeds, ginger, cayenne pepper, fennel seeds, asafoetida powder, and garam masala. Stir to combine and let cook for 2 minutes so the flavors can diffuse.
  2. Once the flavors have diffused, add water, tamarind paste, and sugar. Mix vigorously as the mixture comes to a boil and simmer until the chutney becomes a deep brown in color and thick enough to cover the back of a spoon. This will take up to 30 minutes. Although, the tamarind chutney might look thin after 30 minutes, once it begins to cool, it will thicken.

Trivia

  • Tamarind is native to tropical Africa.
  • Tamarind consumption exists all over the world and it is the main ingredient in cuisines of India, South East Asia, the Americas and Mexico.
  • The tamarind tree has “pod like fruit,” that has edible pulp. The pulp is what gets used in food.
  • When pulp is extracted from unripe tamarind fruit, it is really sour and used as a pickling agent.

vasanthavasan

previous
Pineapple Chutney
next
Noodle Spring Rolls
previous
Pineapple Chutney
next
Noodle Spring Rolls

Add Your Comment