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Naan

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Naan

Features:
  • Veg
Cuisine:
  • 40 mins
  • Serves 5
  • Easy

Ingredients

  • For Dough:

  • For Topping:

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Soft and puffy small breads with brown blisters, naan is an essential part of an Indian meal. They are traditionally made in the clay oven but you can also easily make them at home on a skillet or griddle. They taste exactly the same as the ones in restaurants!

Here is a simple recipe for you to make restaurant styled naan at your home using your normal stove and skillet. Pair it with some butter chicken or mixed vegetable curry and have yourself a scrumptious meal.

Health Benefits

Naan breads are exceedingly healthy. They have just the right amount of food nutrition that your body needs. With just 182 calories per serving, you can eat them with any dish or with tea or coffee.

It constitutes of fiber, fat and carbohydrates in healthy proportions and also fulfills 10 percent of daily requirement of minerals such as magnesium, phosphorus, thiamine and vitamin B-6.

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How to make Naan

  • To prepare the dough, begin with sifting the dry ingredients (flour, sugar, salt and baking powder) into a mixing bowl.
  • Combine milk and oil and add to the dry ingredients. Mix to crumble and knead into a smooth dough. Add extra flour if the dough gets too tacky to handle.
  • Place the dough in a greased bowl and cover with a damp kitchen napkin. Leave it aside in a warm place for 10 to 15 minutes.
  • Divide the dough into five balls. Roll one ball at a time into a small circle.
  • Heat up the skillet on high flame and oil the surface slightly.
  • Place the rolled circles on the skillet and cook for two to three minutes. Wait until it is puffy and lightly browned.
  • Brush the uncooked side of the dough with butter and then flip. Let each side cook for two to four minutes and remove.

Trivia

Naan is Persian word that means bread. In Balochi it is spelled as nagan, nayan in Pashto, and nyn in Sogdian.

Started off from Central Asia, naan has now successfully made way to the Western countries. It is usually seen as a generic word denoting plain bread, but in the Indian subcontinent, naan refers to a certain bread type that is slightly thick and is close to pita bread in appearance.

Naan is often mixed with Roti, considering that both are flat breads. The difference is in their ingredients; naan is made with all-purpose flour whilst Roti is made with whole-wheat flour.

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