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Macarons d’Amiens

Features:
  • Sweet
Cuisine:
  • 40 mins
  • Serves 20
  • Easy

Ingredients

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Macaron d’Amiens was invented in France centuries ago, but it wasn’t until the 20th century that it became such a double-decker affair.

Although it is commonly served as double cookie, originally it was served as a single cookie. Do you know that many towns in France still sell the yummy macarons in their original single layer self?

There are plenty of reasons behind the popularity of macarons d’Amein. Part of the reason is that the macarons offer such classic rich and creamy flavors that they instantly become everybody’s favorite.

Secondly, there is nothing quite as fulfilling and satisfying as the colorful and highly appealing – macrons d’Ameins – and that’s why everybody loves to eat this pretty dessert.

Health Benefits

Macaron d’Amiens is packed with calories and fats so try not to eat too many of these!

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How to Make Macarons d’Amiens

  1. Preheat the oven at 350 degrees F.
  2. In a large bowl, mix almond powder, sugar, honey, jelly, vanilla, bitter almond extract, sweet almond oil and egg whites. Mix these ingredients thoroughly until the consistency is slightly thick. Make sure it is not too thick.
  3. Reserve the mixture in a closed bowl. Cool it in the refrigerator for 12 hours.
  4. With the dough, shape a long roll of about 2 to 3 inches in diameter.
  5. Wrap the roll with a plastic wrap. Refrigerate it for next 30 to 40 minutes.
  6. Place the dough onto a work surface. Cut it into 1 inch thick slices.
  7. Place the macarons on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper.
  8. Let them sit at the room temperature for 20 to 30 minutes.
  9. Meanwhile, beat the egg yolks in a small bowl. Brush it onto the macarons.
  10. Bake the macarons in the oven for 20 to 25 minutes, until they turn golden brown.
  11. Once they are baked, take them out of the oven. Place them on the cooling rack.
  12. Serve the delicious macarons d’Amiens and enjoy!

Trivia

  • Certain French towns – Amiens, Nancy, and Montmorillon – are known to be the pioneers of macarons.
  • Some stories insist that Catherine de Medici of Medici dynasty brought the recipe of macaron with her from Italy when she married Henry II of France in 1533.

The name macaron comes from the same Italian name maccarone, both meaning a soft dough texture.

vasanthavasan

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